What’s New With HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript?

Angry Birds Beta for ChromeAlthough we are still a ways away from being able to use HTML5 and CSS3 to their full potential, some really neat things are being done with them right now. In case you missed the news last week, a new, Web-based version of the wildly popular game Angry Birds was unveiled. For the most part, that application is built using HTML5 and JavaScript (relying heavily on the new <canvas> element and all of its power).

There was some minor controversy over the game, after it was discovered that it still requires Flash in order to play the game (to produce the sounds and music for the game rather than using HTML5 audio), but there are some potentially valid reasons for that.

Download and Test ChromeOS

The other day, I noticed someone on Friendfeed posted a link to a live USB image of Google’s ChromeOS. I was a bit skeptical at first, as we’ve seen many fake builds of ChromeOS over the last year or so. However, after doing a bit of research, it appears that this is the real thing.

Quickbooks Online Available to the Masses

Quickbooks Online - IE6 Warning MessageUp until a few months ago, the only way to use the Quickbooks Online interface was to do so through Internet Explorer. The interface did not work at all for people using browsers other than IE, which meant that it was wholly unavailable to Linux users and Mac users (I have no idea whether it worked on Mac’s version of IE or not, but I’m fairly certain it didn’t).

Then, in October, the application was updated to begin working with Firefox on Windows and Safari on Mac. This was a step in the right direction, but still didn’t make the interface available to Linux users.

OpenSUSE 11.3 Milestone 1

A few days ago, the OpenSUSE team released the first milestone of OpenSUSE 11.3. One of the biggest changes in this new version of SUSE is the inclusion of the LXDE desktop environment. LXDE is supposed to be fast, lightweight desktop environment. I’ve not heard of LXDE previously, but I have to admit that the screenshots I’ve seen make me very curious about it.┬áMilestone 1 also includes the first RC of KDE 4.4 and the brand new 2.29.5 version of Gnome.

This new release also includes the latest beta versions of OpenOffice and VirtualBox, along with the newest stable release (3.6) of Firefox. If you are a fan of OpenSUSE, or you’re interested in trying out beta software and operating systems, I would definitely recommend you give it a shot. It looks like SUSE is making great strides forward in their development.

Batch Rename Files in *nix

Every once in a while, you may find yourself in a situation where you need to rename a whole batch of files on your Web server. In my case, I find this especially useful when someone provides me with a folder full of friendly-named files (files that contain spaces, special characters, etc.) and I want to make them a little more Web-friendly. On Linux and Unix-based computers, it’s really simple to do this from the command line. To do so, simply use a command similar to the following:

OpenSUSE 11.2 Released

Hot on the heels of the Ubuntu 9.10, the OpenSUSE team officially released version 11.2 of their desktop operating system yesterday. The new version of OpenSUSE includes KDE 4.3 and OpenOffice.org 3.1, with preparations for Gnome 3.0 early next year. In addition, OpenSUSE has announced that, from now on, upgrading the operating system in-place will be a recommended option for existing users (previously, as with most other Linux builds, users were encouraged to install a fresh copy rather than upgrading). In addition, it’s now possible to encrypt the entire hard disk and for users to begin using the ext4 file system. From the looks of things, OpenSUSE and Novell are making great strides forward with their operating system. I am curious how this desktop will stack up against the new Ubuntu, which has been getting mixed reviews.

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