Google IO 2012 Moved to June & Now Three Days

google ioThis morning Google announced that they have moved the Google IO conference from May to June 2012. The blog post on the Google developer blog has all of the details on the new dates. Google I/O 2012 will now take place from June 27-29, 2012 in San Francisco.

No details yet on when registration will open for the event – last year the registration sold out in minutes so you better be quick this year.

I attended the event last year as a paid attendee and thought it was ok overall – way too crowded. Frankly it seemed like most people went for the stuff they handed out which included a Samsung Galaxy Tab tablet and a Samsung Chromebook.

I wonder how Google will deal with the people who already booked travel and have to pay fees to change their tickets/hotel bookings.

Google Releases mod_pagespeed for Apache Web Servers

Last year Google released Page Speed — a suite of tools to make webpages load faster. There is a Page Speed extension for Firefox/Firebug which helps web developers see how their web pages and web applications are being loaded and the time it takes for each piece of the page to load.

Today they announced the release of mod_pagespeed, a module for Apache Web Servers. Google notes, “(the module)…perform many speed optimizations automatically. We’re starting with more than 15 on-the-fly optimizations that address various aspects of web performance, including optimizing caching, minimizing client-server round trips and minimizing payload size. We’ve seen mod_pagespeed reduce page load times by up to 50% (an average across a rough sample of sites we tried) — in other words, essentially speeding up websites by about 2x, and sometimes even faster.”

Google is working with GoDaddy to get mod_pagespeed installed on all of their webservers.

Here’s a simple video from Google to show you a basic webpage and the difference in loading time with and without using mod_pagespeed.

Moogo Offers Inexpensive & Professional Website Creation

Moogo lets you create professional looking websites with a range of design and layout options for almost any type of content site. There are a wide range of options inside the Moogo portal and site creation is very quick and easy. It’s just three simple steps and if you can use Microsoft Word, you will be able to use Moogo.

The only thing you need to decide with Moogo is what features you want to use. Moogo offers you a Free Website with minimal options and features, something very basis if you are not ready for a full web presence. Then there are paid options ranging from $4.99/month to $14.99/month. I wont go into explaining the offerings for each of the paid plans, but I will explain the steps on how to setup the Personal Website plan:

Selecting a Layout

The first step is all about selecting the correct layout for your site. Moogo offers a variety of layouts from which you can select the one that best suits your needs. Assign the headers, the header is the top image on your page and you can select from a variety of categories, from Interests to Information Technology. You can preview your selections on the right side to see the picture of what the page looks like.

Amazon Lowers Prices for Amazon EC2 Reserved Instances

Amazon’s Web Services division has announced a new pricing model for EC2 reserved instances today. The reserved instances offering launched earlier this year and is basically a pre-paid option for the EC2 service. Amazon offers a lower rate in return for you locking into a one or three year contract.

From what I can tell, the pricing dropped quite a bit (some in the comments say 30%) – for example:

  • small instance one year price dropped from $325 to $227.50 and three year price dropped from $500 to $350

There’s no doubt that Amazon wants to own the web services market and continuing to provide more service for lower prices keeps the momentum moving forward. Check out my notes from the Amazon web services seminar earlier this year.

New Web Development Job Search

Today we launched a new job search for web development jobs with job aggregator Indeed. The job search starts with a generic search for web development jobs. From there you can modify the search to find exactly the job you are looking for. Some searches might be for php, html, ruby, html, etc. and in locations like New York, 90210, San Francisco, Portland, etc.

You can also post a job on the board for $30 which includes distribution across the Indeed network.

So get off your couch and get your self employed so you can buy more tech crap and tweet about your new job.

Programming your own PHP framework Part 2 – MVC

This is part 2 of the programming your own php framework – view part 1. The below article was authored by Terry Smith. Terry is an aspiring entrepreneur and PHP code ninja working for b5media. He spends his “weekends” and “free time” working on all sorts of crazy ideas and one day wants to rule the world (or a small part of it)!

To get things started, you should be familiar with the Model-View-Controller paradigm.  The basics components are models (classes/objects/etc.) that represent items in your application (users, database records, etc.), controllers which do the processing for a page or module and views, which contain the HTML/CSS for your output.  You can read more about it here.

Step 1: Directory Structure

As noted in the last part, I have chosen to structure my URLs in the format

domain.com/[controller]/[module]?vars

In this case, the controller indeed represents the controller in the MVC paradigm.  I will take a moment to explain the directory structure I’ve used; again, note that you can use almost any structure for your own applications.

/config – Basic configuration files (database settings, etc.)
/controllers – Controllers are all in this directory.
/lib – Default library files included with every new site I deploy (database class, URL rewriting, templating and other base classes)
/models – Custom models for each application (users, sessions, etc.)
/views – View files (PHP files), that contain the HTML
/web – The actual web directory we point our web server to.
There are two things of note here.  First, our images, CSS, etc. go into our /web directory, since the web server can’t read anything above the /web folder.
Second, and most important, all of these files should be outside/above the directory you actually point your web server to serve files from.

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