Saying Good-bye to Brizzly

It’s been quite a while since I’ve tried to use Brizzly, but I did enjoy the features they offered. For a long time, it was one of the few Web-based interfaces I could use to manage my social media accounts. The other day, when I was temporarily using a computer that didn’t have Chrome installed (so I couldn’t use ChromeDeck), I tried visiting Brizzly only to find that they were shuttering the service.

Today, the official notice went out to Brizzly users. Following is the message that was sent out:

ChromeDeck – Tweetdeck for Chrome

TweetdeckFor the past few weeks, I have been using ChromeDeck (the native Tweetdeck application for the Google Chrome browser) fairly exclusively as my desktop Twitter client. I am very pleased with the application, and am extremely impressed at how similar the appearance is to the desktop app. There are a lot of neat features that you won’t find in the full-fledged desktop version; but there are also a few features I used regularly in the AIR application¬†that I sorely miss in the Chrome version.

Twitoaster Has Been Unplugged

Last week on the official Twitoaster blog, it was announced that the service would be shutting down almost immediately (as of March 20). Sadly, I have used the Twitoaster plugin on multiple WordPress installations because of its ease of use. It was  great tool allowing WordPress posts to be pushed to Twitter automatically, and came with the added benefit of tracking when a blog post was tweeted (it even went as far as to allow you to automatically publish those tweets as comments on your posts).

The Power of Social Media – The MB Tweet Race

Those of you that follow me on Twitter (and didn’t participate) are probably painfully aware of the amount of tweeting I did this week. It was all for a good cause, though.

Mercedes-Benz hosted a “Tweet-fueled race” to the “big game” (don’t want the NFL to sue me for using their trademarked name). Essentially, from the morning of Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2011 until this evening (Friday, Feb. 5, 2011), four teams challenged their Twitter followers to show support for them and their charities. Each tweet that included your team’s hashtag gave your team a little virtual fuel to make it from their starting point to Dallas, Texas. There were various challenges, such as posting photos of landmarks, Twitter rounds of songs, etc.

The New Twitter Bookmarklet

For those of you that haven’t heard, Twitter has released an official bookmarklet to allow you to tweet about just about anything you find online. While I appreciate the fact that Twitter is moving forward with tools to make it easier for its users to share information through its service (the official Twitter iPhone app, the official Twitter “Tweet” button for websites and blogs, etc.), I wish they’d put a little more work into this new bookmarklet.

Personally, I am so accustomed to using the Friendfeed bookmarklet (it’s really basically the only bookmarklet I use on a regular basis), I am disappointed that the Twitter bookmarklet doesn’t function the same way.

Important: Twitter Updating Authentication Methods

Twitter fail whaleI honestly have no idea when this was announced, but Twitter will start disabling its “Basic Auth” on Aug. 16, 2010 (the system will be completely unavailable by Aug. 31). For Twitter users, this doesn’t really mean anything. However, for Web developers that use various interfaces and plug-ins to share information on Twitter, this is big.

The majority of API libraries and classes that were (and, as of this writing, still are) listed in the official Twitter API documentation will stop working. This change, as far as I can tell, will effect the way tweets are sent and the way tweets are received. Therefore, whether you’re trying to post tweets from an external source, or you’re simply trying to list your latest tweets, if the interface uses the old system of Basic Auth, it’s going to stop working on Aug. 31.

Pages: