Tables in HTML

Over the last few years, there has been a huge movement (and rightfully so) away from using tables to organize the layout of HTML pages. However, some seem to be taking things a bit too far.

The main reason for moving away from tables was to help make page layouts more semantic. Tables do still have a place in Web design and development, though, when they make sense semantically. Tabular data should be displayed in tables. Some designers and developers seem to forget that from time-to-time.

edUI Conference 2010 – Call for Proposals

The official “Call for Proposals” has been issued by edUI. If you’ve got something to share with a group of Web professionals from colleges, universities, libraries and other educational institutions, please consider submitting a proposal. Following is some information about the call for proposals.

We seek dynamic speakers willing to share their knowledge and expertise about Web design, user experience design and development. Preference is given to presentations that offer practical methods and ready-to-use techniques and tools.

  • Have you completed an innovative Web project at your institution that you want to tell others about?
  • Are you enthusiastic about introducing new technologies and techniques to other Web professionals?
  • Do you want to share your ideas about user experience design and development?
  • Are you ready to add something exciting to your CV or resume?

A Nice Resource for Images and Icons

A few weeks ago, I found I needed a few icons for a project on which I was working. After a little bit of Googling, I came across the “All Free Download” Web site. Be forewarned, it is kind of a minefield of advertisement banners, but there are some great images to be found there.

Many of the images are available as vector files, allowing you to save them at basically any size you choose without worrying about degrading the visual quality of the image.

If you find yourself in need of imagery or icons for any projects, you might want to pop on over to All Free Download and see if they have anything to fit your project.

5 Things You Shouldn’t Do With a Satellite Connection

Satellite_dish_1_C-BandAs I’ve mentioned a few times before, I am stuck with a satellite Internet connection at home. DSL and FIOS are distant fantasies, cable comes to the end of my driveway and stops (they refuse to run it any further, and won’t let me run it myself) and a T1 line is just way out of my price range. So, I’m stuck dealing with huge latency and bottom-of-the-barrel “high speed” Internet service.

For everyone else that moves out to the boonies and might have to make the switch to a satellite provider, I thought I’d provide this quick list of five things you shouldn’t (or can’t) do when you’re using a satellite connection. Still, I am thankful that I’m at least able to get some sort of “high speed” connection, as going back to dial-up is not something I want to even think about.

edUi 2009 – My Recap and Reactions

On Monday and Tuesday of this week, I attended a great new conference known as edUi (a combination of edu – referring to college and university Web sites – and UI – the acronym for “user interface”). The conference featured sessions about HTML5 and CSS3, usability testing, writing Web content, design, social networking, mobile Web development and much more.

Schedule

The layout of the conference was unlike anything I’ve attended in the past. The first day, we were all assigned (based on first and second choices we indicated upon registration) an all-day session. We checked into the conference in whatever session we were scheduled to attend, and then settled in for a long day in one room. The second day, we all attended a morning keynote together, then got to choose one of the sessions we’d missed the day before. The “reprise” as the organizers called it, was a 75-minute summary of the six-hour session that the presenters had made the day before. We then got to choose a 45-minute session, lunch, an hour long keynote (once again, all together) and one more 45-minute session.

Sony Prepares to Release PS3 Slim

Sony Playstation 3 SlimApparently, Sony announced a new version of the commercially-struggling Playstation 3 console a few weeks ago. The new version is known as the PS3 Slim and will boast almost all of the same features as the original PS3. The new PS3 Slim will apparently be available on Tuesday, Sept. 1. At this time, only one version, a 120 gig model, of the PS3 Slim is being released. The new model will be priced at $299, nearly $200 less expensive than the cheapest version of the original PS3.

Yahoo! Plugged In gaming news reports that the new version of the console will consume 34% less electricity, be almost 4 pounds lighter than the original and is only about two-thirds the size of the original.

So, what’s the one apparent drawback of purchasing the PS3 Slim instead of buying the old mammoth version? The PS3 Slim will not include backwards-compatibility; meaning that you will not be able to play your Playstation 2 games on the new PS3 Slim. Will this make a major difference to consumers? Only time will tell. Microsoft caught a lot of flak when the Xbox 360 console was released with extremely limited backwards-compatibility.

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