Eliminating Options in a Gravity Form

For those of you using WordPress, GravityForms can be a real godsend. GravityForms is a premium plugin that makes it extremely simple to create forms on your website. However, there are a few features that aren’t quite built out the way they probably should be, yet.

One of those features is the ability to stop people from submitting forms with duplicate values. While this feature is extremely useful the way it’s currently implemented when it comes to duplicate entries for people’s names, email addresses, etc., it’s not overly useful when it comes to select elements, radio buttons and checkboxes. As it is currently implemented, all of the options are still available for the user to select when filling out the form, but when they submit the form, they get an error message indicating the option has already been selected.

With the use of some GravityForms filters, though, you can make things slightly more usable.

What Are Your Favorite WordPress Plugins?

Have you ever wondered what your friends’ favorite WordPress plugins might be? Are you tired of slogging through pages and pages of 5-year-old blog posts just trying to find good plugins for your WordPress site?

The folks at WordPress have made a small but significant change to the way the plugins repository works. Now, when viewing the details of a plugin, you can click the “Favorite” link to add that plugin to your list of favorites. Then, anyone that visits your profile will be able to see which plugins are your favorites.

Five Reasons Why HTML5 Rocks For Mobile

Andrew Holden is co-founder and Chief Experience Officer (CXO) at Weever Apps. Andrew is a web development expert and frequently writes about mobile visitor engagement and online best practices.

HTML5 is everywhere this year!  Google supports it.  Facebook’s all over it.  It’s clear that HTML5 is the future for mobile.

Ok, that’s cool. So what is HTML5 and what does it do for mobile?

Great question! HTML5 is the latest version of HTML – the standard for presenting and structuring content on the World Wide Web.  One of the great advancements with HTML5 is that it allows websites to function like mobile apps by offering design capability that is mobile friendly, as opposed to laptop/desktop friendly.  This means websites can be designed to fit mobile screens and have a user interface that is easy to control and highly functional with a touch screen. The term used for this technology is “web app”.

For practical purposes, there are two ways to implement a “web app”.

  1. Websites can be designed so that they can scale from a desktop monitor down to a smart phone screen.
  2. An independent web app can be designed, which will open when a website is accessed on a mobile device.

This new approach of presenting mobile content is breaking down barriers – including time, money, and the ubiquitous App Store.  The doors are now being opened to individuals and small business.  Big players are also gravitating to this alternative as they recognize the benefits.

Here are the facts about the mobile market:  50% of all local searches are now on mobile devices.  This is largely due to smart phone ownership surpassing cell phone ownership in the US and other countries.  Despite this notable adoption, most businesses don’t have any mobile solution of any kind – let alone the subsequent marketing benefits.  Unfortunately, traditional app development is just too time-consuming, expensive, and technical.

Bing Undergoes Redesign

I would guess not many of you have noticed this, since much of our audience probably regards Bing as a joke, but the team over at Bing has redesigned their search results pages. The page is now much cleaner than it once was, with a true no-nonsense feel. The only items on the page are the search results, one or two ads and a list of related searches.

In addition to cleaning up the overall design by removing all of the color splashes and by moving the related search list from the left to the right, they’ve also removed your search history and the ability to narrow your search results by time period.

Although the page’s color palette now resemble Google more than it ever has before, the actual layout of the page is much more minimal than Google’s current design. Below, I’ve included a comparison of Bing and Google. Both searches were performed within an incognito window, so I am not signed into either service. If you’re interested in more details about the redesign, you can view the official post on the Bing blog.

Using Media Queries on Windows Phone

More than likely, you probably haven’t noticed, but Windows Phone 7 devices don’t fully support media queries (used mostly for responsive and adaptive designs). However, media queries can be used for designs presented on Windows Phone, you just have to know how to do it.

For the most part, I have seen designers and developers include media queries within their stylesheet(s). Windows Phone 7 will ignore media queries directly in your CSS. Instead, you have to set up separate stylesheets for each media query. For instance, rather than having the following code in your main stylesheet:

WordPress 3.3.2 Released

In the midst of preparing WordPress 3.4 as a stable public release, the WordPress team chose to put out a security update. WordPress 3.3.2 includes a handful of bugfixes for WordPress itself, but also includes security updates to three of the external libraries included with WordPress.

One of those external libraries is Plupload, which is used by WordPress to implement the current media uploader. Plupload is a library developed by the team behind TinyMCE, and supports uploads using HTML5, Silverlight, Flash and more so that it will work in almost any browser. In December, a security update was released for Plupload that stops cross-domain scripting in the Flash portion of the library. That update was included in the new version of WordPress.

The other two libraries are no longer used by WordPress out-of-the-box, but they remain packaged with the system for backwards-compatibility reasons.


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