WordPress: A Tip About WP Super Cache

First of all, let me apologize for having been so absent over the last few weeks. As you may or may not have heard already, we just launched the new website at University of Mary Washington, and things have been hectic trying to put the final pieces into place.

One of those final pieces was to get WP Super Cache up and running on the site, in order to keep our server from overloading. When we first launched, I didn’t realize that we didn’t have the plugin configured properly, and our various plugins and theme functions really started to drag things to a crawl.

After doing a lot of digging and debugging, I found that WP Super Cache was ignoring cached files throughout our server because they all included GET variables.

Some WordPress Gallery Features You Might Not Know About

The other day, I was playing around with the WordPress [

] shortcode, and came across the need to exclude an image that was attached to the page. The image I needed to exclude was kind of like a featured image, and I didn’t want it to appear again in the gallery itself. So, I searched for information about excluding images from the WordPress [

] shortcode, and came across the related WordPress Codex article.

While reading that article, I noticed a handful of features I’d never known about in that particular shortcode. After all, I always basically assumed that the options WordPress gives you when inserting a gallery were probably the only options that were available.

WordPress: Adding “Get Shortlink” to Custom Post Types

For some reason, by default, WordPress only includes the “Get Shortlink” button when editing posts; not when editing any kind of custom post type or when editing pages. Honestly, I’m not sure why, since pages and custom post types all use the same basic short URL as standard posts (example.com/?p=[post_id]).

The solution is simple, though. You just need to hook into the get_shortlink filter. Following is a simple function that will help you add the button to all “publicly_queryable” post types in your theme.

WordPress: Adding “Page Links To” to Custom Post Types

If you use WordPress (especially as a content management system) and you haven’t heard of Mark Jaquith’s “Page Links To” plugin, you should definitely check it out. Basically, the plugin allows you to set up a WordPress page or post to redirect to a different URL. It can be very handy for setting up redirects, adding menu items for pages that wouldn’t normally appear in those menus, etc.

One issue with the plugin, however, is that it does not (as of version 2.4.1) support custom post types. It only supports WordPress posts and pages. If you want to set a custom post type to redirect to a URL other than its permalink, you can’t do so with this plugin.

However, there is a pretty simple way to add support for custom post types to this plugin; and the changes do not require you to edit the plugin itself. Instead, you can make all of the necessary changes in your theme’s functions.php file.

Image Manipulation Script Vulnerabilities

Yesterday, Mark Maunder published a blog post making people aware of a vulnerability in the popular PHP image manipulation script TimThumb. Anyone that uses TimThumb should definitely read that article to make sure that the vulnerability gets patched. Almost a year ago, though, I posted (and I was far from the first) about a vulnerability in another extremely popular PHP image manipulation script; phpThumb.

Quick Tip: WordPress Visual Editor Button Icons

The process of adding a new button to the WordPress visual editor is fairly simple; as long as you understand how to develop a new TinyMCE plugin (which is a somewhat involved and laborious process that I will probably cover at another time).

One thing I discovered yesterday, though, is that one line of code makes the difference between the Visual Editor using a custom, static image as the button and the Visual Editor using a span that you can stylize with CSS (to fit better with the native Visual Editor appearance).

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