The Bootstrap Framework Controversy … Should You Use It or Not?

Released back in 2011, Twitter’s Bootstrap framework is one of the most popular – if not the most popular – front-end website development framework out there, at least in 2015.

And not without a reason. Bootstrap provides a really easy to grasp way of crafting your site designs and thus allows you to create great looking and mobile-optimized builds in hours, instead of days.

Bootstrap should you use this framework

That being said, there’s a lot of conflicting opinions around Bootstrap with almost equal number of people on both sides of the barricade. Some experienced developers (like the guys over at ThemeShaper, for example) have addressed various issues with the framework and pointed out why it might not be the perfect web development solution after all.

So today, let’s look into some of the framework’s known traits, both in terms of the positives as well as the negatives. However, I’ll try not to sway your opinion in any direction by telling you what I consider the right solution here – in terms of using Bootstrap or not – but instead, I just want to provide enough insight for you to be able to make your own decision.

Hello with Bootstrap and Responsive design

Happy new year to all HTMLCenter readers!

HTMLCenter blog meets this year with completely refreshed look & feel and new monthly Newsletter (we will give our best to make ‘monthly’ – regular). In addition to this we have made few other minor changes to overall blog structure.

How and why we did it all?

Site look & feel redesign project was sitting on my to-do list for a while, but somehow it managed skip down in priority order each month.

HTMLCenter runs on WordPress (very good CMS indeed), and the old custom theme we had was becoming much outdated.

Old WordPress theme was build with desktop Internet browser in mind and didn’t look good on mobile device browsers at all. Increasing number of HTMLCenter readers arriving via smart devices was a constant reminder that we had to find the time and do blog redesign.

Node, HTML, JavaScript and Hackathons

These days creating a new piece of web or mobile software feels a lot like combining already made pieces together. Adding some glue so they do not fall apart, releasing version v1 and repeat the loop many times. Until you are satisfied that nobody cares or that you have actually built something useful.

Agile, lean and other tech product methodologies have thought us to use this process. And ever increasing modular nature of web and back end frameworks make it easy to follow these steps. Many hours are already spent by community of smart people while creating all the reusable modules for your future app.

Good example to illustrate this trend is Hackathon Starter project. Its created for people building web and mobile apps with help of Node.js. As the name suggests it was created as reusable prototype for hackathon projects. In hackathons you usually have ~24 hours to create a somewhat working project. As this template is beefed up with main modules it will save lots of time and will let you concentrate on the specific functionality you want to achieve.