Creating a Header/Footer to be Used on all Pages

I referenced this in a post from a few months ago, but never bothered to expound on it. You cannot use cascading style sheets (CSS) to create headers, footers or menus that will be re-used on all of your pages. Instead, you have to use server-side includes (SSI).

There are a handful of ways to use SSI, and they are available in most all of the Web development languages used today. Although I think the use of repeating headers and footers is somewhat outdated, opting more for using templates that dynamically include your content, I’m going to try to teach you a few ways to include your headers, footers and/or menus on all of your pages.

Strange Problem with XML and VBScript

In one of my recent posts, I brought up the subject of using XML files as opposed to databases. When we released the referenced application to the public and began using it, I encountered a strange problem that took me the better part of the morning to solve.

After the first new news release was posted, which included an amazing amount of text and HTML code (the meat of the news release was two extremely long lists – broken into four-column tables – of award recipients). Once the release was posted, the script that accessed the XML files began timing out every time I tried to access the page. Of course, because the news release was posted almost immediately after making the page live, I had no idea what was actually causing the timeouts.

An introduction to the DOM

In the near future, I plan to write a rather in-depth tutorial explaining how to manipulate the DOM using javascript. Essentially, that tutorial will teach how to properly add and remove elements from your Web pages using javascript. If all goes well, that tutorial will be simple enough for beginners to understand, and will help add a lot of power to your javascript arsenal.

However, before I can get into that, we need to explore and understand the DOM.

XML Vs. Databases

I recently had occasion to consider whether to use XML files or a traditional database when constructing a Web-based application at work. It took a lot of careful consideration and research to decide which way I was going to go.

In the end, I chose to use XML files, and I will explain why.

Image manipulation in VBScript

Four guys from RollaI was working on a script the other day at work and came upon the need to determine the dimensions of some images. Because the script was being written in VBScript, I was basically stumped, since, although I’ve figured out a great deal about simple scripting in VBScript, I’m still an absolute novice when it comes to file manipulation and the more advanced features available.

I hit the Web and started googling. Luckily, I came across a great solution on one of my first tries. The Four Guys from Rolla (which, if you’re working with VBScript and haven’t bookmarked this site, yet, I highly recommend it – they seem to be the number one authority on VBScript) offered a great tutorial, with code, explaining how to obtain the dimensions and a lot more information from any image.

Export to Excel with VBScript

I’ve seen a lot of articles on the Internet explaining how to export a page to Excel using VBScript. Unfortunately, they all seem to have problems in their methodology.

Many of the articles are helpful, but they don’t seem to include all of the information you need in order to export HTML content successfully from a VBScript page into an Excel document.

I’ve finally found a method to successfully export my data to Excel, and I hope it will help some of you, too.

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