OpenSUSE 11.2 Released

Hot on the heels of the Ubuntu 9.10, the OpenSUSE team officially released version 11.2 of their desktop operating system yesterday. The new version of OpenSUSE includes KDE 4.3 and OpenOffice.org 3.1, with preparations for Gnome 3.0 early next year. In addition, OpenSUSE has announced that, from now on, upgrading the operating system in-place will be a recommended option for existing users (previously, as with most other Linux builds, users were encouraged to install a fresh copy rather than upgrading). In addition, it’s now possible to encrypt the entire hard disk and for users to begin using the ext4 file system. From the looks of things, OpenSUSE and Novell are making great strides forward with their operating system. I am curious how this desktop will stack up against the new Ubuntu, which has been getting mixed reviews.

Linux Mint 6 KDE Edition Released

A few days ago, the Linux Mint community released the community edition of the KDE version of Mint. If you’re a fan of Linux Mint, but you prefer the KDE desktop environment over Gnome, be sure to pop on over and download the new version.

KDE 4.2 Released

The latest version of the K Desktop Environment (KDE) for Linux has been released. Early reports seem to indicate that this version (version 4.2.0) is a huge improvement over the earlier versions of KDE 4.x.

I am still waiting for Linux Mint to release KDE 4.2 in their repositories; but once they do, I will be installing it and checking it out. I am also planning on booting into my Mandriva installation later today to see if KDE 4.2 is available there, yet.

If you’re using a Linux distribution with KDE 4.2 installed, please share your experiences with the new desktop environment.

Linux Distro Reviews – Mandriva 2008.1

Mandriva Linux logoThis will be my second review of popular Linux distributions. This time, I will be taking a look at Mandriva 2008.1.

Mandriva is a distribution that is built with KDE as its main desktop environment. This particular version comes packaged with KDE 3.

Gnome vs. KDE – The Differences Between Desktops

Over the next few weeks or months, I intend to review some of the more popular Linux distributions. In order to do so, though, I feel I need to begin by offering a little bit of background into some of the more integral parts of Linux. Throughout my reviews, I will most likely make some reference to some of these items and the way a distribution behaves with a default installation. However, things like the desktop environment (which is what I’m going to focus on in this post) are almost always completely interchangeable between distributions, and should only be considered pros and cons of a distribution when discussing the default behavior of that distro.

OpenSuSE 11.0 Released

On Thursday, June 19, OpenSuSE 11.0 was officially released by Novell. The newest version of OpenSuSE includes many new software packages on the installation DVD. Some of the new packages include Firefox 3.0, KDE 4.0, Compiz Fusion (apparently a 3-D display module – pictured at right) and a newer media player called Banshee 1.0.

All-in-all, the new release from the OpenSuSE community includes over 200 new features that are only available in OpenSuSE.

Having been a SuSE user for a little more than three years, I cannot recommend this download highly enough. When I first installed SuSE, I was very weary of using Linux, as I had heard everyone talk about how difficult Linux was to use if you weren’t a complete computer geek. SuSE was a different experience altogether, however. The desktop is extremely intuitive and the entire OS is very easy to use. It took very little effort to understand how to configure and use SuSE, and I very quickly came to love it.

If you are curious at all about Linux, you should definitely download the new live CD from the OpenSusE download site. A live CD is a disc that contains the entire base operating system on a single disc. Live discs do not require you to install anything on your computer. Rather, the entire operating system runs directly from the disc. Of course, with a live disc, you don’t have nearly as many configuration options and you can’t really store your files effectively. However, the newer live discs from SuSE have even included a one-click install option right on the desktop, should you ever decide you want to install the system on your computer.