Tips for Boosting Conversions

ClickTaleThe team at ClickTale have released a report from data they gathered from users of the ClickTale service. The report highlights tips for boosting conversions on blogs and ecommerce websites.

Some of the tips include:

  • read this and win
  • visualize it
  • put the most important content on top
  • make content pop
  • you ask too much
  • test – repair – retest

Creating Usable Javascript Links

As I surf the Web, I come across countless Web sites that use one of the following methods to invoke a javascript function when someone clicks a link:

<a href="javascript:somefunction()">Click to invoke somefunction</a>

or

<a href="#" onclick="somefunction()">Click to invoke somefunction</a>

Unfortunately, these types of links are completely unusable for anyone with javascript disabled (and, for that matter, the second example is completely useless to people that can’t “click” the links, such as people using older handheld devices). Even worse, the second example can be extremely annoying, as it focuses the screen back to the top of the Web page when you click it.

What Does a Web Site Have to Have?

Everyone has their own opinions on the most important elements of a Web site. Most will say that content is king. Some will say that usability and accessibility are most important. Others will tell you that the design of the site is the most crucial part of the process. However, it’s rare that you see someone discuss what pages a site really needs to have.

Kyle James, a consultant for HubSpot and the founder of dotEduGuru, a Web site dedicated to discussing all aspects of Web site development at higher education institutions, made a post a few weeks ago about the three pages that every Web site needs. He claims that every Web site (whether it’s a corporate site, a college Web site or just a personal site) must include an “About” page, a “Contact” page and a site map.

I agree wholeheartedly with his assessment. Some of the first pages I begin developing for any Web site I create are the “About” and “Contact” pages. Then, for any site that includes more than a handful of pages, I begin working on the site map.

What do you think? Do you always try to include these pages? Are there other pages you have to have on a Web site?

User Interviews – Analysis Simplified

You’ve conducted the interviews – enlightening weren’t they? It’s now time to put all that information that’s in your head down on paper, and pull it all together into a complete picture.

This article follows on from our previous article which gave tips on how to conduct the interviews themselves. Here we give you some possible techniques to use whilst analysing your interviews, helping mould your results into something tangible.

Form your findings into a narration

After interviews you’ll find that you’ve lots of interesting thoughts and ideas bouncing around your head, but probably in no clear structure. The results will be much easier to understand and convey to others if they are ordered into a clear narration.

Customizable Websites – The Definitive Guide

Several popular websites have let their homepages be customised by users. New web technologies have made it possible to add slicker customisation interfaces so more sites are allowing users to customise their pages. But, should you do the same? Will it make your website better for users or will it make it unnecessarily complicated? Will users even want this feature on your site?

Types of customisation

Currently websites offer a variety of customisation methods, allowing users to:

Is Your Site User Friendly?

Molly at DemoGirl has created a video that takes a look at several sites and their usability. On her Twitter piece, I could add a million items but one I would absolutely add is a way to do a multiple delete on the direct messages. Deleting one at a time is time consuming and my bet is that by adding a mass/select delete option, they could reduce by millions of messages.

Check out our 30+ usability tutorials.

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