Google Launches Initial Google+ API

googleGoogle’s latest attempt at social networking, Google+, now has a new first-cut at a developer API. The Google+ Platform blog has info on the release of the new API.

Startup blogger Robert Scoble put together a list of some of the feedback on the new API – it seems the reaction is mixed. RSS creator Dave Winer says Google “doesn’t get it”. Why am I surprised that a company who has a VP, Bradley Horowitz, post on Twitter that he only cares about Twitter users with over 100,000 followers might not fully understand how to promote a new API to developers?

The Google Plus team notes that they are using the follow existing standards and best practices where they can:

  • Our API methods are RESTful HTTP requests which return JSON responses.
  • Our payload formats use standard syntax (e.g. PoCo for people info, ActivityStrea.ms for activities).
  • We use OAuth 2 for secure trusted access to user data.

The Google Plus API is located here if you want to start to play with it.

Retrieving Information from the WordPress Codex

While working on the Extended Super Admins plugin for WordPress, I decided to try to pull information out of the WordPress Codex and use it in the plugin. I did a little Googling, but didn’t come up with much.

Then, I decided to look for API information about MediaWiki (the script used to present the WordPress Codex). After a bit more Googling, I discovered that there is, in fact, an API built into MediaWiki installations. The API is the same on the WordPress codex as it is on WikiPedia (and most other MediaWiki installations, I’m sure). Thankfully, much of the documentation is built right into the API file itself, so loading it up in your browser gives you pretty good instructions on how to use it.

Posting to Twitter from Your Web Site

Most content management systems and blogging platforms have a Twitter plug-in available nowadays that allows you to automatically submit tweets when you update a page or post a news item. However, for those of us that aren’t using packaged systems, we have to look elsewhere for solutions to post updates to Twitter.

The other day, while making some changes to the news posting script we use at work, I decided that we should post our news updates on Twitter when we post them to the Web site. As such, I started reviewing the Twitter API. Thankfully, Twitter has a good resource on libraries you can use to make your life easier (after all, there’s no point in reinventing the wheel if you don’t have to).

New York Times Launches an API Tool

New York Times developer Nick Thuesen has announced the launch of the first API tool from the NYT. Nick notes, “With this tool, you can experiment with Times APIs without writing a single line of code. Select parameters on the left, and view the resulting request and response on the right.”

The basic idea is that rather than figuring out the right API code to write, this new API tool will allow you to do it by using a variety of pulldown menus and text prompts. The code/result is provided which can then be modified as needed to work with your application.

Checkout the API tool here: http://prototype.nytimes.com/gst/apitool/index.html and all of the NYT API offerings.

Microsoft Opens Up With More Interoperability

MicrosoftMicrosoft has posted a new announcement regarding several updates to how they handle APIs, documentation and interoperability today. The announcement is regarding the following products: Windows Vista (including the .NET Framework), Windows Server 2008, SQL Server 2008, Office 2007, Exchange Server 2007, and Office SharePoint Server 2007. The four principles that have been declared are:

  1. ensuring open connections
  2. promoting data portability
  3. enhancing support for industry standards
  4. fostering more open engagement with customers and the industry, including open source communities.

Please check out all of the live call notes on our sister site CenterNetworks.