Quick Tip: WordPress Visual Editor Button Icons

The process of adding a new button to the WordPress visual editor is fairly simple; as long as you understand how to develop a new TinyMCE plugin (which is a somewhat involved and laborious process that I will probably cover at another time).

One thing I discovered yesterday, though, is that one line of code makes the difference between the Visual Editor using a custom, static image as the button and the Visual Editor using a span that you can stylize with CSS (to fit better with the native Visual Editor appearance).

WordPress: Adding a Proper Visual Editor to Your Plugin

When developing a new plugin for WordPress, sometimes you want to add a visual/WYSIWYG editor to one of your plugin’s settings fields. Unfortunately, most of the tutorials you’ll find online only explain part of what needs to be done in order to get that working. The main problem I have encountered when looking at these tutorials and example plugins is the fact that they only invoke the visual editor; they don’t offer any way for the user to use the editor in HTML mode.

Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Express Released

Earlier today Microsoft released the final (RTM) versions of their Microsoft Express offerings. The software was previously available as a beta release. The tools are all free and appear to be a good way to get started with Microsoft development. Unlike many free development software offerings, apparently these tools can be used for commercial development.

The Microsoft Express software includes:

  • Visual Web Developer 2010 Express
  • Visual Basic 2010 Express
  • Visual C# 2010 Express
  • Visual C++ 2010 Express

If you are planning to use the Microsoft Express software, check out the very detailed FAQ which offers insight into what you can and can’t build using the free versions of the development software.

Managing User Permissions on Unix

I am basically posting this here as a reference for myself, but I’m sure the information will be helpful to other people out there, as well.

Occasionally, when working on my Web server, I need to create a new user on the server and grant one or more other users permission to view and edit files within the new user’s home directory. This task, in itself, does not seem all that difficult on the surface. However, because most Unix servers are set up (and rightfully so, for security purposes) not to allow most users to navigate outside of their own home directories, it becomes a problem.

Let’s say, for example, that you have two users on your Web server that you want to allow permissions to view and edit each other’s home directories, but you don’t want them to have access to any other files and folders on the Web server.