iPhone OS 3.0.1 – Does It Really Fix Anything?

On Friday, Apple released iPhone OS 3.0.1 for iPhone devices. The release was apparently put out in response to a vulnerability pointed out during the Black Hat Security Conference. To install the “patch” for this vulnerability, iPhone owners must download an entirely new version of the iPhone operating system (230 megabytes) rather than just being able to install a smaller patch.

However, there are rumors floating around the Web that the patch only fixes one of two separate vulnerabilities exposed at the Black Hat conference. The first vulnerability, known as the Miller hack, is apparently what the new OS patches. However, another vulnerability, referred to as the Miras/Lackey hack is still open and can potentially effect any phone on a GSM carrier (not just the iPhone). About the Miras/Lackey hack, @musclenerd says “3.0.1 doesn’t begin to fix them.”

It will be interesting to see if any patches or fixes come out to close the hole exposed by Miras and Lackey, how long it takes to do so, and from where the patches will come (will the phone companies themselves release them, or will they come from the manufacturers).

Apple’s Major Announcements During WWDC 2009 Keynote

Apple held the keynote kick-off of its Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) with a few major announcements. However, not much of it was really earth-shattering.

I followed the WWDC keynote via gdgt’s live blog and ArsTechnica’s live blog. Both Web sites did a good job of reporting what was going on, complete with photos of the presentation.

What’s Missing from the iPhone?

As I use my iPhone 3G more and more, I notice more and more things that frustrate me about it. Please don’t get me wrong; I am not complaining about the iPhone; I am simply positing ideas as to what I would like to see added. As a Web developer, there are quite a few things I would love to see added to the device. If you know of any iPhone apps available that perform any of these tasks or actions, please let me know.

Let me make this clear, however: I will not be jailbreaking my iPhone. Even if the phone was not owned by the government (which it is), I would still have no interest in jailbreaking it.

The iPhone – My Review

A few days ago, I got an iPhone from work. I have played with it a bit, and have to say that I’m impressed for the most part. However, there are still quite a few issues that I would love to see solved. Following is a list of the pros and cons of this gadget, as I see it.

Zune 2.0 – My Review

Well, I’ve now had a Zune 2.0 80 gig digital media player for a little while, and I’m ready to offer up my review.

First of all, let me preface this review by getting the following facts out in the open:

  1. I, personally, have only owned one other digital media player, which was a Toshiba Gigabeat F-40 (which was actually an early predecessor of the Zune). I have a bit of experience with a Creative Zen and using a PSP as a digital media player, too.
  2. I have extremely limited experience with iPods, so I can’t comment too much on how the Zune’s features compare to the iPod’s
  3. Although I am in many cases anti-Microsoft and to a certain extent pro-Mac; I am, oddly enough, pro-Zune and very much anti-iPod.

Now that I’ve explained my limitations and biases, it’s time to move on with the review.

What’s in the box?

The 80 gig Zune comes with the Zune itself, a user’s manual, a pair of “premium” headphones and a Zune sync cable. It’s quite a step down from the box my Gigabeat F-40 came in (which included a cradle, a software CD and a remote control, too), but it seems fairly standard for today’s media players.

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