HTML Presentations with Opera

Because Opera is not an extremely popular browser, most developers probably aren’t aware of one of its greatest features: Opera Show mode. Opera Show mode is the official name of the full screen mode for Opera (technically, it’s only called Opera Show when a projection media style sheet – discussed below – is present); and it brings with it a great possibility.

More than two years ago, Opera added support for the projection media mode in CSS. Whenever the browser is expanded to full screen mode, it activates the projection media, allowing you to apply a completely different stylesheet to the full screen page than you have in other settings.

Comments in HTML5

As we’ve discussed on this blog in the past, HTML5 introduces a lot of new elements that are intended specifically to imply semantic information. One of the elements being introduced is the <article> element.

For the most part, the <article> element is supposed to denote a block of information that can stand on its own (essentially, the main content of the page or post). When developing a blog template. The spec currently describes the <article> element with the following verbiage:

What Is HTML5?

There’s been a lot of talk about HTML5 and all of the new elements it introduces. Forms will be built and used completely differently, the structure of documents will be much more semantic, and new features will be available to website and application developers.

But, what are these semantic elements? Are they really anything new? Will they change the structure of your document at all? The simple answer is “no”. The new elements, for the most part, just make your documents easier to parse and understand (for machines and for people using assistive technology). Very few of the new elements are really all that new; they’re just the same old elements with new names for new purposes.

Captions in HTML5

As more and more browsers begin to support HTML5 and its elements, one of the nice things we can all begin using is the <figcaption> tag. When coupled together with the new <figure> tag, the <figcaption> tag semantically connects a caption with an illustration (not necessarily an image illustration; it can be a text illustration).

Free HTML5 Mobile Training From O’Reilly

Beginning on October 6, 2010, O’Reilly will offer a free 10-week HTML5 mobile course. The live sessions will be held each Tuesday at 3PM Pacific Time. It appears you can download the sessions at a later point but there will be a fee for the download.

Here’s an overview of what the instructor notes you will learn during the course:

  • Discover what’s new in HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript for mobile development
  • Build your own Twitter App with these technologies
  • Create apps that detect the orientation of mobile devices
  • Use geolocation and maps in a location-based app
  • Enable mobile users to use your app offline
  • Use HTML5 web forms to create an address book app
  • Create drawings and animation with JavaScript and HTML5’s canvas element
  • Use HTML5’s audio and video elements to build a movie trailer app

You should have some basic knowledge of CSS and HTML for the course. They also recommend that you are on a Mac but you can participate if you use a PC or Linux.

Creating a Favicon for Apple Devices

I’m making this post as much for my own reference as for anyone else’s. As you may or may not be aware, Apple devices (the iPod Touch, the iPhone and the iPad) use their own icons for bookmarked websites and apps, rather than utilizing the standard favicon.

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