A Quick Lesson in WordPress Semantics

As much as I love WordPress, there are quite a few elements and functions in the system that can be a bit confusing, and even ambiguous. In this article, I’m going to try to explain and unravel a few of these items.

What’s the difference between the “home” page and the “front page”?

To many users, the terms “home” page and “front page” might seem like the same thing. However, in WordPress, they’re treated as two different elements. The “home” page is the main page that shows blog posts. If you install WordPress and don’t change any of the settings, this will be your site’s front page. However, if you modify the “Settings -> Reading -> Front page displays” setting to select “A static page (see below)”, and you choose a page for the “Front page” and a page for the “Posts page”, the “home” page is no longer the first page on your site. Instead, the first page on your site is the “front page”, now.

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Zeus and WordPress Part 3: SSL Issues

While working to get WordPress functioning properly on a Zeus Web server, one of the issues I came across was the fact that I couldn’t seem to get any SSL functions working properly. I tried 2 or 3 different plugins, and all of them started causing infinite redirect loops as soon as they were activated.

Eventually, after quite a bit of investigating and testing, I found the cause of the issue: that particular server (and, presumably, all Zeus servers) doesn’t use any of the same indicators that SSL is being used that apache does. On apache servers, PHP usually has a handful of indicators that SSL is currently being used to serve the page. For instance, there’s a server global variable called “HTTPS” that gets set to “on” for many PHP configurations; SSL is generally served over port 443 instead of port 80; etc.

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Zeus and WordPress Part 2: Fixing Query Strings

If you’re trying to get WordPress working on a Zeus Web server, and you’ve gotten as far as using a good rewrite script to make permalinks work properly, you might have noticed that query strings don’t work at the ends of your permalinks. At first, it seemed like this wouldn’t be too big of an issue; it just meant that users wouldn’t be able to preview posts/pages, and there would be one or two other issues they’d have to live with. However, after using the site that way for a little while, we started coming across more and more issues that this caused, and it finally reached a tipping point.

To solve the issue, I wrote a simple function that runs any time a 404 error occurs on the site. Essentially, it parses the path of the requested page, cuts off the query string temporarily, and then searches the database for a post or page that has the slug at the end of the path.

You may be wondering why I didn’t just parse the request/get variables sent with the page. The problem is, those were empty in each of the cases I tested.

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WordPress and Zeus Part 1: Getting Permalinks Working

For those of you that might not know (and I was one of you about a month ago), Zeus is a Web server package that’s used instead of apache by some Web hosts. If you’re planning to use WordPress, and you have a choice between apache and Zeus, I would definitely recommend choosing apache. However, sometimes you don’t have a choice in the matter; and you have to do what you can to make things work.

WordPress will work out of the box with Zeus, but a lot of things won’t behave the way you might expect. One of those things is the permalink structure.

Instead of getting nice, clean URLs like “http://example.com/blog/2012/01/my-first-blog-post/”, you get “index.php” shoved in there (like “http://example.com/index.php/blog/2012/01/my-first-blog-post/”). You can correct this issue, but it’s not quite as simple as updating an .htaccess file (in fact, without some jiggery-pokery by your Web host, Zeus doesn’t support .htaccess at all). Instead, you have to apply a rewrite script to your server configuration.

After quite a bit of searching and trial & error, I finally found a working rewrite script configuration for WordPress. A hosting company called ZipHosting posted the scripts below in their knowledgebase. The first script is set up for you to use if WordPress is hosted in a subdirectory, and the second is for use with WordPress in the root directory.

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Back From Hiatus (Hopefully)

After a long break, I am hopefully back to blogging somewhat regularly again. I needed to take some serious time off to re-balance my priorities in life, and to get a solid grasp on all of the things I need to do on a daily basis.

At least at the start, I’m not planning to try to blog every 2 or 3 days the way I had been doing; but I am hoping to post a new article once each week.

I apologize to anyone that actually reads my blog posts. I didn’t initially intention to disappear for quite so long.

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WordPress Releases Version 3.3 With Tumblr Importer

WordPress founder Matt Mullenweg has just announced the release of version 3.3 of the WordPress blogging/cms software. It looks like the majority of the changes are cosmetic inside the admin tool including some updates to the help for new users. The big feature I noticed in their overview video below is the new ability to easily import a tumblr blog into WordPress.

The one big update I’d love is the ability to set the “add an image” option to always be set to “by URL” because I use (and I assume others do too) Amazon S3 for storing images.

You can update your WordPress software to 3.3 now by using the auto-update function with the administration interface.

Here’s the features overview video for WordPress 3.3 from the WordPress team:

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Google IO 2012 Moved to June & Now Three Days

google ioThis morning Google announced that they have moved the Google IO conference from May to June 2012. The blog post on the Google developer blog has all of the details on the new dates. Google I/O 2012 will now take place from June 27-29, 2012 in San Francisco.

No details yet on when registration will open for the event – last year the registration sold out in minutes so you better be quick this year.

I attended the event last year as a paid attendee and thought it was ok overall – way too crowded. Frankly it seemed like most people went for the stuff they handed out which included a Samsung Galaxy Tab tablet and a Samsung Chromebook.

I wonder how Google will deal with the people who already booked travel and have to pay fees to change their tickets/hotel bookings.

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Nokia Offers Free User Experience Evaluation for Mobile Apps

I received the email below from the Nokia Developer Launchpad team. If you are building an app for either the Series 40, Symbian or MeeGo platforms, Nokia is offering to review your mobile app to help increase the user experience. It looks like there are only 40 reviews available, so you better contact Nokia asap if you want your app reviewed.

Here are the important pieces of the Nokia offer:

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Upcoming Panel on The Future of PHP

On November 17, Engine Yard will host a discussion around the future of PHP. Engine Yard describes the event, “If you are a PHP developer using PEAR and Pyrus, we invite you to join us this week as we explore the future of PEAR and Pyrus. We’ll be discussing issues such as where PEAR/Pyrus will be going in the next few years, what obstacles may be on the horizon, and how they’re going to get where they’re going.”

One of the panelists is Till Klamp├Ąckel who many of you know as one of the people who worked with HTMLCenter for many years. Till also just published a book (in German) about the database service CouchDB which you can purchase on Amazon.de.

The panel is free, will be streamed live and the panel will take questions via Twitter. If you are interested, you can register for the event here.

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HP Says TouchPads are Gone

Earlier this evening, HP sent out an email message saying that they are finally officially out of TouchPads. I didn’t even realize they had gotten the final batch in stock; but, apparently they did, and those are now gone. Following is the text of the email they sent:

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